Archive for the News Category

Woodhams Lab presents summer 2021 research

Brady Inman receives best talk award at NEPARC, and Rakeyah Ahsan presents research at the meeting for Salamander Models in Cross-Disciplinary Biological Research, and REU student Ednita Tavarez-Jimenez presents, “Commonly traded amphibian is susceptible to the emerging fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium salmandrivorans.”

Plos Pathogens publishes collaborative research on infection risk for Eastern newts

Map of infection risk

Invasion risk of Bsal into Eastern newt populations adjusting for temperature-dependent susceptibility.

Dr. Molly Bletz, Brandon LaBumbard, and Dr. Douglas C. Woodhams publish results in Plos Pathogens. Eastern newts are found to be highly susceptible to the emerging fungal pathogen, Bsal. Environmental temperature has a key role in the epidemiology.

Carter ED, Bletz MC, Le Sage M, LaBumbard B, Rollins-Smith LA, Woodhams DC, Miller DL, Gray MJ. (2021) Winter is coming–Temperature affects immune defenses and susceptibility to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans. PLoS Pathogens 17(2): e1009234. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1009234

Read the publication.

 

New Review on Sickness Behaviors Across Vertebrate Taxa

Mechanisms of Sickness Behaviors

Physiological mechanisms of sickness behaviors across vertebrate taxa.

Dr. Woodhams contributes to a new review on Sickness Behaviors Across Vertebrate Taxa published in Journal of Experimental Biology.

Lopes PC, French SS, Woodhams DC, Binning SA. (2021) Sickness behaviors across vertebrate taxa: proximate and ultimate mechanisms. Journal of Experimental Biology, 224(9):jeb225847. doi: 10.1242/jeb.225847.

 

 

 

Dr. Tokash-Peters featured in The Scientist

Dr. Amanda Tokash-Peters is a “Scientist to Watch” featured in The Scientist. She continues to work on mosquito microbiome research after graduating from UMass Boston, and is now a professor at Centenary University.

National Science Foundation grants Professor Woodhams the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Award

Dr. Woodhams pictured with Northern leopard frog, a focal species for investigating microbiome interactions with host skin defenses

The National Science Foundation has granted Professor Woodhams the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Award.  The award will fund five years of research in the Woodhams Lab, focusing on Microbiome Regulation by Amphibian Skin Peptides, and will support a new course, Microbiome and Disease Ecology Lab, focused on authentic research experiences for undergraduates. Congratulations Dr. Woodhams!

NSF Grant Summary | UMass Boston Press Release 

Woodhams’ graduate seminar students publish in Genome Biology on Host-Associated Microbiomes

Path model of internal microbiomes depicting direct and indirect effects of immune complexity in the context of the best biotic and abiotic predictors of microbial phylogenetic diversity.

Genome Biology publishes “Host-associated microbiomes are predicted by immune system complexity and climate”, with more than a dozen students from Dr. Woodhams’ two graduate seminar courses on microbiomes as co-authors. The paper includes combined data from the Earth Microbiome Project as well as 50 additional studies to evaluate global-scale patterns of bacterial diversity and function across 654 host species and 15,000 samples.

Read this Publication | News Article

Woodhams, D.C., Bletz, M.C., Becker, C.G., Bender, A.B.*, Buitrago-Rosas, D.*, Diebboll, H.*, Huynh, R.*, Kearns, P.J., Kueneman, J., Kurosawa, E.*, LaBumbard, B.C.*, Lyons, C.*, McNally, K.*, Schliep, K., Shankar, N.*, Tokash-Peters, A.G.*, Vences, M., Whetstone, R.* Host-associated microbiomes are predicted by immune system complexity and climate. Genome Biol 21, 23 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-019-1908-8

Bolded are members of the Woodhams Lab. * Denotes graduate student co-author.

 

Woodhams lab contributes to PLoS Pathogens article on temperature and immune defenses

Invasion risk of Bsal into Eastern newt populations in North America, adjusting for temperature-dependent susceptibility.

In their article, “Winter is coming–Temperature affects immune defenses and susceptibility to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans,” the Woodhams lab publishes findings with collaborators Matt Gray and Louise Rollins-Smith funded by their collaborative NSF EEID grant.

Read this publication.

Carter ED, Bletz MC, Le Sage M, LaBumbard B, Rollins-Smith LA, Woodhams DC, Miller DL, Gray MJ. 2021. Winter is coming-Temperature affects immune defenses and susceptibility to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans. PLoS Pathog. Feb 18;17(2):e1009234. 

Fighting a Fungal Scourge – Woodhams lab research highlighted by PNAS press

Probiotic treatments for amphibians at risk of emerging disease is one management approach proposed by the Woodhams lab. This historical overview provides context for novel microbially-based disease management strategies and research frontiers.

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Amy McDermott, Science Writer. Proceedings of the National Academy. Feb. 18, 2019. Fighting a fungal scourge.

Journal of Animal Ecology Publishes Study on Seasonality of Mucosal Skin Defenses

Both skin bacteria and host peptide patterns transitioned through the seasons. The bacterial microbiome (point connected to gray line) is strongly correlated with peptide profile (point connected to black line) in this Procrustes plot.

The Journal of Animal Ecology publishes “Preparatory immunity: Seasonality of mucosal skin defenses and Batrachochytrium infections in Southern leopard frogs” with Ph.D. candidate Brandon LaBumbard and Dr. Woodhams. The paper explores the effects of seasonality on host immune and microbial defenses against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infections. 

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Le Sage, E.H., LaBumbard, B.C., Reinert, L.K., Miller, B.T., Richards-Zawacki, C.L., Woodhams, D.C., Rollins-Smith, L.A. Preparatory immunity: Seasonality of mucosal skin defenses and Batrachochytrium infections in Southern leopard frogs. J Anim Ecol. 2020 Nov 12. doi: 10.1111/1365-2656.13386. PMID: 33179786.

 

 

Undergraduate Sydney Horan publishes first-authored study

Notophthalmus viridescens, the Eastern Newt.

Herpetological Review publishes “Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is Widespread and Associated with Water Temperature in the Eastern United States”, with Woodhams Lab undergraduate Sydney Horan and postdoc Molly Bletz. The study found that in a survey of Eastern Newts down the east coast of the United States, Bd was highly prevalent and correlated with water temperature. Bsal was also found to be absent in the survey.

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Horan, S., McDonald, C., Bletz, M. C. 2020. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is Widespread and Associated with Water Temperature in the Eastern United States. Herpetological Review 51(3), p. 484-488.

Contact

Douglas C. Woodhams, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
UMass Boston | Department of Biology
100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston, Massachusetts 02125
Phone: 617-287-6679