Welcome to the Woodhams Lab

We study the immunological ecology of infectious disease, and the evolution of symbiotic microbiota. This includes aspects of host-symbiont-pathogen biology, environmental physiology, and conservation medicine. Our goal is to advance probiotic strategies to mitigate the effects of chytridiomycosis on wild amphibian populations, and to reduce the risk of arbovirus transmission by mosquitoes. Development of novel biotherapies to stabilize beneficial microbial communities is one application linking ecology to public health.

Fieldwork ranges from locally in Massachusetts to tropical rainforests. While ecologically focused, research methods in the Woodhams lab incorporate immunological chemistry and mass spectrometry, next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of microbial diversity and community function. A new focus of lab research involves development of germ-free tadpoles for studies on host-microbe interactions in disease ecology.

"The pathogen is nothing.
The terrain is everything."
-Louis Pasteur

About

Dr. Doug Woodhams has 16 years of experience in disease and immunological ecology. With more than 50 publications, his research focuses primarily on emerging disease and environmental change...

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Opportunities

We are looking for creative, self-motivated, and committed individuals, including undergraduates, Master's, and Ph.D. students. If your research interests complement those of the lab, contact us with...

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Research

Our research vision is to advance probiotic strategies to mitigate the effects of chytridiomycosis on wild amphibian populations, and to reduce the risk of arbovirus transmission by mosquitoes...

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Teaching

As a teacher of ecology, Dr. Woodhams aims to inspire a fascination in discovery and an appreciation for the intricate beauty of nature. Beyond learning facts and methods, students will develop...

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I enjoy facilitating my students’ research and collaborating with them on the design and progress of their work.
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Methods

  • Antifungal Isolates Database
  • Skin mucosome function
  • Field collection of antimicrobial peptides from amphibian skin
  • Treatments against chytridiomycosis
  • Probiotic therapies
  • Characterizing microbiota

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Contact

Douglas C. Woodhams, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
UMass Boston | Department of Biology
100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston, Massachusetts 02125
Phone: 617-287-6679